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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2015-12-13, 1:44am
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Default Sooty beads - only certain glass

Hi, I've noticed that any CIM "opalino" that is pink or light purple gets sooty really easily. (I don't think CIM actually calls them opalinos but you know the type of glass I'm talking about, right?)
I don't have a pic to post right now, but I will if I can find one.
How do I make this not happen? =)

I am using a mini-CC and I know I tend to work hot. =/
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Old 2015-12-13, 2:47am
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I think from what I have read that you have hit the nail head on, too hot!
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Old 2015-12-13, 4:26am
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Well then I have no patience for that glass! LOL!
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Old 2015-12-13, 8:38am
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Too hot in this case might also mean too close to the torch face.

The fuel sometimes does not get a chance to burn up completely if you work too close to the torch and some of the chemicals in the color mix may latch on to unburnt fuel so readily that it will pull the unburnt fuel out of the flame and capture it in the glass surface.
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Old 2015-12-18, 2:05am
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the common name for these glasses is "alabastards"
'nuf said?
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Old 2015-12-18, 2:17am
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Yes, steiconi! The green and turquois are fine. It's those light pink/purple that are impossible!
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Old 2015-12-26, 9:37am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedslug View Post
Too hot in this case might also mean too close to the torch face.

The fuel sometimes does not get a chance to burn up completely if you work too close to the torch and some of the chemicals in the color mix may latch on to unburnt fuel so readily that it will pull the unburnt fuel out of the flame and capture it in the glass surface.
Yes, exactly what Phill said. Try working further out in the flame. You can also test your flame for areas that are more reducing by using a rod of glass that shows reduction easily. Examples are: effetre op. turquoise or boro reactive glass like the GA Amazon series.
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Old 2015-12-26, 10:23am
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I think it was anise white that shows soot in even the smallest amounts if the fuel oxygen mix is even a little off.

I have heard of folks keeping a piece of that glass on the bench just to help reset the mix whenever they light up the torch.

Learning the fine points of where the sweet spots of heat control and complete combustion are is a skill that takes a great deal of time at the torch and there isn't much I know of that will reduce the time investment.
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