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  #1  
Old 2006-01-12, 4:25pm
Rose Leslie's Avatar
Rose Leslie Rose Leslie is offline
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Default Oxygen tank set up?

I know that the tank has to be out side and chained to something so it won't fall. Now my question is how much pressure and what type of regulator should a tank have for lampworking? I asked at the welding supply about regulators and they were dumbstruck. They didn't know a thing. So I need to know a couple of things please. If I have the tank how long will it last? Can I use it once in a while or have to every day? So every one I need some help with this one please.
What type or size regulator should I get also. Right now I have an oxycon which I love dearly. But in fact I am going to need some more power if I'm going to go to Boro or harder glass. So that means some oxy tanks. Help please.
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Old 2006-01-12, 4:50pm
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Hi Rose, Let's start with "the tank has to be outside", it doesn't. The only thing that is really dangerous about tanked oxy is if the tank is knocked over and the top breaks off, then you could have a cannon running through your house and your walls. That's why you need to chain it. Oxygen supports combustion, but will not ignite even if you stick a match to it, unlike propane, which does have to be outside because of the flamability.

With regard to the regulators, I have no clue why a welding supply company would be "dumbstruck" when you asked about regulators. There are many different sizes and types of regulators and the good ones last forever - mine are over 35 years old and still function perfectly. Look at the ones offered at some of the beadmaking suppliers, like Frantz, Arrow Springs, Wale and that can give you a point of reference. Generally, the bigger they are the more expensive. Two stage regulators are the best, but cost more, and are not absolutely necessary by any means, just a convenience.

How long your tank will last is completely dependent on what size tank you get, what kind of torch you use and what kind of beads you make. Using boro will generally use up the oxy faster than working with soft glass. And you don't need to use it every day. I didn't torch at all in December and the amount of oxy in the tank didn't change at all. Just make sure to shut off your tank after every session and unless the shut-off valve has a leak you won't loose anything.
Pam
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  #3  
Old 2006-01-12, 6:06pm
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You don't have to go to tanked oxy! I work with boro only. without using tanked O2. I use a red-max torch with 3- 5 liter oxygen concentrators . They are all tied together into the oxy line on my torch. I work with tubing up to 50mm and solid rod up to 41mm with no problem at all.
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Old 2006-01-13, 5:27am
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You will want a regulator with a maximum output pressure of 30 PSI. Don't get a 120 PSI regulator, you won't be able to set an accurate pressure for your torch.
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  #5  
Old 2006-01-13, 12:25pm
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I've got tanked and an oxy con. I'd go to a new welding supplier, too. As far as the PSI setting, check your torch manufacturer's recommendation for that type of torch.
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Old 2006-01-17, 3:29am
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I LOVE my Victor Fire Power regulators. They came in my dad's welding apparatus. These are larger and more durable than the economy sized ones (Victor Medalist) that some of the glass suppliers sell... to make a long story short, I ended up returning two sets of those little economy jobbies because they just didn't work right, or blew their diaphragms within hours. My dad permanently loaned me his extras, and I have not had any problems since. I've noticed it is cheaper to buy an entire welding apparatus than it is to buy all of the pieces alone. I think my dad got his at Harbor Freight or a locally owned tool supply, and I think the whole thing cost $150 - I called about my particular regulator model, and they cost $110 each if purchased alone. Go figure.

Pam is right, you don't have to have the oxygen outside. I have mine strapped to a dolly, sandwiched between a heavy table and the wall. I have a 251 CF tank (maybe 5' tall), and with my Minor, it lasts approximately 30-32hours, set at about 6 1/2 or 7 psi. When I use my Lynx, it lasts somewhere between 18-24 hours, set at 9 or 10psi. (My welding supplier loves it when I use my Lynx. ) Your results may vary. If you cannot handle such a large tank (and would like one that large) shop around and ask about delivery charges and whether they will even deliver to a residence. You may opt to rent 2 smaller ones that you can handle yourself. If you are in charge of transporting the tank(s), make sure the valve cap is screwed on tight.

Liquid oxygen is the kind of oxygen that is "use it or lose it". It comes in special tanks called dewars (maybe dewers) and they will vent oxygen if they sit there too long unused. They also tend to grow ice on them. I knew someone that used that stuff, and he told me that his tank, which was close to 6' tall and about as big around as a hot water tank, will last 2 weeks whether he uses it or not.

Sarah
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  #7  
Old 2006-01-17, 6:45am
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DEWAR is the correct spelling.

I use them in my studio and we typically get about 4 weeks out of them. It certainly pays to discuss what you are doing with your oxygen supplier - one local supplier gets me a dewar with zero pressure, and these tanks, once pressurized to about 75 psi (by me with the pressure builder valve) will last 4-5 weeks. The other supplier delivers the dewar pre-pressurized to 150 psi and these tanks only last about 3 weeks.

Typically speaking, a dewar will start to vent somewhere between 250 and 350 PSI, depending on the design of the tank. If you can, get the 350 PSI tanks, your checkbook will appreciate it.

Now, when do you move to a dewar? If you use more than 4-5 "K" tanks per week is the usual breakeven point.
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  #8  
Old 2006-01-17, 7:39am
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Hey Mike,

How many torches (and what size) are you running off that tank? We are getting ready to get a liquid tank for our studio. I'm not sure the size (they only offer one size) but I know they said if you don't use them, in 5 days they will be empty.
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Old 2006-01-17, 8:00am
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A CC, a Baracuda, a Tiger Shark and two piranha's.

All 5 torches running at the same time.
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