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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2018-07-16, 5:16am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Default Kiln working COE 104

Does anyone here use 104 for fusing / kiln work? Wondering if it's possible to fire polish beads in the kiln - and just curious about using some of the beautiful rods and frit in the kiln. Perhaps starting a piece in the torch and being able to add to or alter the shape in the kiln?

My main question is I have some beads that some unwanted texture - a result of poor fire polishing - can I get a smooth finish by fire polishing them in the kiln like I do my fused glass cabs? Does anyone know of a source for suggested COE 104 firing schedules?

Thanks June
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  #2  
Old 2018-07-17, 6:39am
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designerbeads designerbeads is offline
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curious about this myself. I did know a woman who was making buttons in the kiln using 104 glass but she has passed to the great glassy glory hole in the beyond so I can't ask her. Maybe look at the sites for fusers
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Old 2018-07-17, 10:09am
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FosterFire FosterFire is offline
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I have reheated beads in the kiln for re-working them. Remember that even if the mandrel is sticking out of the kiln that the metal will be way too hot to hold with bare skin. Metal is an excellent conductor of heat.
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Old 2018-07-20, 4:17am
jsknow4445 jsknow4445 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by designerbeads View Post
curious about this myself. I did know a woman who was making buttons in the kiln using 104 glass but she has passed to the great glassy glory hole in the beyond so I can't ask her. Maybe look at the sites for fusers
I work a lot with fusing bullseye coe 90 - and have lots of contact with groups and friends that are experts in that area. Most fusers either haven't been exposed to coe104 or have no interest in it for various reasons. I'm open to experimenting and will share any discoveries that I find helpful. The one thing that concerns me is compromising the stability of the glass with additional heat work and how to know there is a problem if it's not immediately apparent. By that I mean that the piece did't break in the kiln - if it looks like a success is it safe to assume all is well? Is there a way to test for proper annealing or a way to determine if a piece is likely crack in the future?
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Old 2018-07-20, 1:46pm
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Moira Moira is offline
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I've added torchworked BE to fused BE pieces with no problem - I'm sure it works the same for 104 glass. I believe it's possible to buy 104 Effetre sheet (though no UK supplier), I daresay that's what it's intended for. If it's properly fused and annealed, it should be fine.

You can test transparent glass for stress with polarised sheet or a stress meter.
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