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Safety -- Make sure you are safe!

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  #1  
Old 2014-01-21, 1:04pm
holub holub is offline
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Default Eye problems from flameworking -ptygerium

Hi.
I have got an eye condition caused by too much UV light.
It is quite nasty (try to google it) and when it grows it can only be operated.

I have only used didymium shades while working by my torch (a minor). It always looks worse after flameworking, but then goes down a bit after a couple of weeks.

Has anyone else had the same problem?
And what did you do?
Do I need better glasses, that also blocks UV light? And which would that be?

I havent been to a proper eye doctor yet, but I will.
I hope I can continue to work by the torch.

Johanna Holub
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  #2  
Old 2014-01-21, 1:23pm
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Are you working with soft glass or boro?

I have that, but it began before flameworking and I don't notice it flaring after I do a session. I don't torch every day though, and usually only 2-4 hours when I do get to it.
My doctor told me to use visine to help with the redness I get when I rub my eyes too much. (Not eye doctor, family doctor)
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  #3  
Old 2014-01-21, 2:34pm
Alaska Alaska is offline
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Diddy glass blocks the sodium flare from hot/melting glass and has little to no effect on UV.

If interested in blocking UV then a shade 3 or a shade 5 welding plastic or glass lens is the needed item. Welding supply shops such as Air Gas or Air Liquide supply this type of eye safety item to the welding industry.

What works well for some, is to use a diddy shield (Blue Moon Glassworks) and then use a set of shade 3 or 5 glasses. Your other option is a flip-up clip-on shade 3 or 5 that will go over your diddy glasses. (Note: shade 5 provides more UV protection than shade 3 - additional lampwork lighting may be needed when using shade 5.)
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  #4  
Old 2014-01-21, 6:01pm
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one hot beader one hot beader is offline
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Not sure if it would work, but what about a polarising shield or set of clip on polarising sunglasses over the top of your didys?
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  #5  
Old 2014-01-21, 6:42pm
benohio benohio is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one hot beader View Post
Not sure if it would work, but what about a polarising shield or set of clip on polarising sunglasses over the top of your didys?
Polarized light blocking simply blocks reflection light. It wouldnt have an impact on flameworking.

Shade 3's would be too dark for a Minor. You want the purple ish shaded Shade 1's.

Lampworking torches emit no UV, its not in that spectrum.
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  #6  
Old 2014-01-22, 1:51am
holub holub is offline
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Ok, a lot to think about.

If itīs true that lampworking emits no UV, then the ptygerium could be caused by something else. I talked to an optician used to work with the glassworks here in sweden, and he mentioned only didymium as a protection. I work with soft glass. He also mentioned that ptygerium could be caused by using contact lenses for too long.

well,I have to learn more about this, it seems like.
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  #7  
Old 2014-01-22, 6:38am
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Working high metal content boro at higher temps does emit some UV. I doubt you'd get enough off of a Minor to make much difference, this is mainly an issue with big torches and larger amounts of glass. Your UV source must be elsewhere.

Robert
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  #8  
Old 2014-01-22, 8:41am
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Do you wear UV blocking sunglasses all the time outside? I got some prescription ones several years ago, and when I am outside or driving in daylight, they are on. Rain, snow, fog, sun, whatever. They are awesome - the polarization helps in any light.
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  #9  
Old 2014-01-22, 10:52am
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houptdavid houptdavid is offline
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Are you using non filtered halogen lamps?
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  #10  
Old 2014-01-22, 4:54pm
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My husband has it. He was checked out by his optomatrist who said it is from sun exposure when he was younger. It can be operated on to remove but not suggested if it isn't bothering the eyesite. He uses visine moisturizing drops to help with the redness and wears sunglasses always when outside.
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  #11  
Old 2014-01-26, 5:27pm
queenofsheba52 queenofsheba52 is offline
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Glad you posted, Johanna.

I have very blue, very sensitive eyes. I wear Auralens specs (no longer available, sadly) and I have a diddy shield that sits in between my torch and my face. I very highly recommend you try a shield along with your diddys. Maybe even get some specs that offer more protection than "just" the dydimium?

Like Eileen, I can't torch every day and I can only spend about two hours at a time at the torch. But -- that's OK! I can still torch, and on the off-days I like to think about what I will make next.

You are very wise to protect your eyes.

Best regards,
Helene
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  #12  
Old 2014-06-26, 4:00am
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I might suggest getting a pair of fit over #3 glasses if it is the lampwork causing your symptoms. Fit overs with good side shielding will allow you eyes to adjust to the darkness and you wont need quit as much increase in task lighting.

My hunch is you are getting drying due to the air movement needed for good ventilation. My eye doctor pointed me to something called Systane eye drop and they are the bomb although they do ask for an arm and a leg and your first born for them.
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  #13  
Old 2014-06-26, 4:53am
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I'll second the Systane eye drops. That's what my Eye Surgeon recommended after cataract surgery. I like the Balance and the Ultra. I use the Gel at night but it's gross. It's like putting warm grape jelly in your eye, but it does wonders overnight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedslug View Post
I might suggest getting a pair of fit over #3 glasses if it is the lampwork causing your symptoms. Fit overs with good side shielding will allow you eyes to adjust to the darkness and you wont need quit as much increase in task lighting.

My hunch is you are getting drying due to the air movement needed for good ventilation. My eye doctor pointed me to something called Systane eye drop and they are the bomb although they do ask for an arm and a leg and your first born for them.
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  #14  
Old 2014-06-26, 8:45am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RSimmons View Post
Working high metal content boro at higher temps does emit some UV. I doubt you'd get enough off of a Minor to make much difference, this is mainly an issue with big torches and larger amounts of glass. Your UV source must be elsewhere.

Robert
This post should be noted again - soft glass does not emit hardly any UV.
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  #15  
Old 2014-06-29, 4:21am
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I have a pingecula which is a precursor to a pterygium. I use Restasis and Refresh Eyes for Sensitive Eyes (no preservatives) to deal with redness and dryness. My opthamologist recommended that I not use any Visine products, or other eye analgesics like Zaditor which can further dry the eyes.

The single most important thing for me is to hydrate. I keep a covered water bottle near my torch and try to take a break and drink after each bead. My torch sessions can last for five to six hours on occasion, but my eyes will be fine after some rest. A bit red, but feeling OK.

Hope you find your own best practices!
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