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  #1  
Old 2012-06-18, 4:28pm
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Jenne Jenne is offline
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Question Not thrilled with GTT Lynx...suggestion?

Ok, so I upgraded from a Nortel Minor to a GTT Lynx shortly before this past Christmas. I was looking for more heat to do larger soft glass work and delve into boro.

The amount of heat a Lynx can produce is amazing, and it melts through boro like butter. I'm just not liking it for my larger soft glass stuff. I guess I'm looking for something bushier, with more ambient heat.

I was looking at a CC Wildcat, and thought that would be a parallel move? Not sure how it handles boro? Hubby said to keep the Lynx, but I don't think he realizes the cost to have both torches.

Oxygen-wise, I have an M20 oxycon, so I need to stay within the oxygen output it can handle. I do have a tank for backup, but tanked O2 isn't ideal because of the distance I have to drive for refills. Sounds like the M20 would handle a Wildcat easy, especially since it runs the Lynx.

Is there another option I'm not considering? I looked at Nortels, but not sure...I loved (still love) my Minor, but not sure how the bigger ones perform.

Thanks for any input/opinions.
Jenne
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Old 2012-06-18, 4:51pm
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Jenne how large are you going in your soft glass work ?
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Old 2012-06-18, 5:38pm
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I found with the Lynx and soft glass to keep the flame pretty small and just crack the top O2 knob enough to let some O2 thru to keep it cool, but not so much that it drives the flame hard and tight.

Also, had to keep reminding myself to work a little farther out and take the work out of the flame often to let the heat soak in before manipulating the glass, cuz yeah the Lynx can really heat those suckers up FAST.
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Old 2012-06-18, 5:52pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddy Tat Glass View Post
Jenne how large are you going in your soft glass work ?
Right now I can do 2" soft glass pieces, but sweat a little because of the lack of ambient heat. I'm not looking at doing huge sculptures, but would like to handle 3" or so. I had an idea that I just couldn't put to practice because when working on one side of the piece, I couldn't heat it enough before I needed to give the other side insurance heat. Well, without burning the snot out of it...I needed to be gentle lol

What torch do you use for your pieces? They seem large and sculptural, though I do believe I remember you saying you work with Bullseye (not sure how that works heat wise, I assume similar enough).

Elizabeth, for your Lynx, are you using tanked or an oxycon? I was wondering if pressure had anything to do with the lack of flame...adjustability (can't think of a better word).

I never utilize the middle knob, just because it makes the torch so loud and I torch at night when my 3 year old is sleeping. I also kinda don't know how to best benefit from it...kinda just winging it.

Anywho, thanks for the input so far y'all
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Old 2012-06-18, 5:54pm
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You just can't beat a Lynx for soft glass and small to medium Boro. I have one it is awesome!! I am also upgrading to a Phantom as soon as I can to have a little more power but it still has the Lynx for the center fire. It's an awesome torch!!
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  #6  
Old 2012-06-18, 7:11pm
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I had a Lynx and ended up selling it and getting a Scorpion for exactly the reason(s) you mentioned. I find the flame of the Scorpion busier than the Lynx and it works great on my Regalia concentrator. It's great for boro too...I think even better than the Lynx. The only thing I miss is the very small pointed flame you can get with the Lynx but all in all ... It's a Scorpion hands down.
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Old 2012-06-18, 7:28pm
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When we first got into lampworking a friend lent us a wildcat
we found two things one it would empty a 240cf oxy ttank in a few hours and two is was buring soft glass colors this is one hot torch.
All GTT torches are know for penitrating flame which is great for boro, sounds like what would be best is a two stage torc like the scorpion mentioned above or the new Bravo.
both of those are made for oxycon use
Gtt Torches also want/need 20psi oxy per manufactur specs wich the m20 supplies but I find I need 3 m20's to run my Cheetah and I do not get full power unless I use tanks
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Last edited by Baywinger; 2012-06-18 at 7:38pm.
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Old 2012-06-18, 8:05pm
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Ok, perhaps I should ask for options *under* $500. Both scorpion and bravo are $780. I know there's a correlation in price to flame size...I just can't afford that much.

I guess I'm trying to go sideways rather than upgrade...same heat but with different characteristics. I don't know if that makes sense?

Argle bargle
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Old 2012-06-18, 8:35pm
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How about sticking with the Lynx and learning how to use it? I do soft glass and boro sculpture on mine no problem. The GTT triple mixes are the most versatile torches available right now. They can run driving penetrating flames as well as soft bushy flames depending on how they are adjusted. It just takes some experimentation. If it is burning or boiling your color, learn to run less oxygen and work farther out in the flame. I usually work a minimum of 4 inches from the candles.
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Old 2012-06-18, 9:45pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenne View Post
What torch do you use for your pieces? They seem large and sculptural, though I do believe I remember you saying you work with Bullseye (not sure how that works heat wise, I assume similar enough).
I use a Lynx and yes, I do work Bullseye. BE is a little stiffer than 104, so it takes the heat a bit better without losing it's shape. Most of my pieces are between 3/4 and 2.5 inches. The Lynx is the only torch I've ever used, except when I'm working in a class.

The way I adjust my flame is I get some nicely shaped tips about 3/8" long using only the left hand oxy knob...then I just barely crack the top oxy knob...this sharpens the tips just a bit. If I'm working something that needs bushier flame then I simply cut back a little on the oxy using the left hand knob...this doesn't work with some colors, like white or pink. I really don't do much adjusting of my flame, I tend to just move the bead where I need it in the flame. I also work further out in the flame and I follow a rule of working only a few seconds on details and then spend 30 seconds or so warming...then back to detail...then warming, etc. I rarely crack a bead...when I have it's been because I start on a detail and got so consumed by it that I forget my time and that's not the torch's fault.

I think my oxy generator's set at 20 pounds (I never have to adjust it, so I'd have to check to be sure) and my regulator is set for 8 pounds of propane.

I love my Lynx, but I think you should use whatever makes you most comfortable.
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Old 2012-06-18, 10:28pm
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I love my wildcat for large sculptural work. The heat is penetrating and gentle. Lots of radiant heat too. I don't know how it would melt boro though. I have never used it for that.
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Old 2012-06-19, 5:20am
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Larry, that's the reason I mentioned when I got the torch, I've had 6 months learning time. Perhaps I was spoiled with the Minor, it is such an easy torch.

Bonnie, thank you for describing how you work on your Lynx. I know most folks using one, love them...so I'm trying to keep an open mind and adjust my working style.

Cynthia, your keepers and fish look like a decent size, what approximate size do you work? With the Wildcat, how do you feel it handles small detail work? Not sure if you solely use the Wildcat or need a secondary for detail?

Side note..
People can always make do with what they have. I'm of the mindset to work smarter, not harder. Example I can think of is with my dog grooming. I can use straight shears for a complete haircut (doesn't matter breed). Give me a pair of curved shears to use as well, and my groom will look ten times better and be finished in half the time...and I won't have as much wrist/arm fatigue.

Tools are made for specific purposes in mind, tend to be utilized for more, whether it's ideal or not.

Not saying my Lynx isn't made for what I want...before I switch, I'm going to really push the limits of how I want it to perform. Try harder at "learning" it. I really want to love it lol
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Old 2012-06-19, 6:59am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenne View Post
Larry, that's the reason I mentioned when I got the torch, I've had 6 months learning time. Perhaps I was spoiled with the Minor, it is such an easy torch.
6 months is not very long. I have been using mine for more than a year and I still learn. Most folks learn one or two flame settings and never really exploit the capabilities of their tools. The Minor is easier but it is also less versatile with less adjustability. The torch is only a tool though and cannot do the work for you. You must learn how to use it to advantage.
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Old 2012-06-19, 9:01am
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I have three torches. A Herbert Arnold, a Mega Minor and a Wildcat. The Wildcat is great for my fish and Keepers and large sculptural work. My fish are about 3" long from nose to tail. For the detail, the flame is very bushy and fluffy so stringer decor for instance is very easy. The thing that the Wildcat won't do that my Herbie will, is adjust down to a fine needle point flame. I don't need that feature too often though. There are advantages to having more then one torch. I feel between the three of mine, I have every atmosphere that I need to make just
about anything. I am not a fan of GTT torches. I have used them to teach several times and I find them to be too focused, and difficult to adjust.

Also, I sometimes use two torches. I have a Japanese torch that I use to keep large pieces warm while I work the details on another torch.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenne View Post

Cynthia, your keepers and fish look like a decent size, what approximate size do you work? With the Wildcat, how do you feel it handles small detail work? Not sure if you solely use the Wildcat or need a secondary for detail?
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Old 2012-06-19, 9:07am
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I have a completely different experience with the Wildcat. It used way less oxy as a Red Max that I used to own. I find it quite conservative. I have never had problems with it being too hot. My Herbie is WAY hotter. It's just an adjustment you have to make while working with different torches. The Wildcat heat penetrates differently then say the Herbie. The Herbie surface heats very quickly but the Wildcat takes longer, and the heat goes all the way through if that makes sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baywinger View Post
When we first got into lampworking a friend lent us a wildcat
we found two things one it would empty a 240cf oxy ttank in a few hours and two is was buring soft glass colors this is one hot torch.
All GTT torches are know for penitrating flame which is great for boro, sounds like what would be best is a two stage torc like the scorpion mentioned above or the new Bravo.
both of those are made for oxycon use
Gtt Torches also want/need 20psi oxy per manufactur specs wich the m20 supplies but I find I need 3 m20's to run my Cheetah and I do not get full power unless I use tanks
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Old 2012-06-19, 12:36pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dusty View Post
I agree with Larry and think you're probably not aware of the torch's potential.

I've been using a Phantom for about 7 years, and mainly just use the Lynx inner-fire. After 6 years of practice, I thought I knew how to use it. I started doing fumed work about 6 months or a year ago and have learned so much about the torch from playing with different settings while trying to get different effects. There is a huge variety of usable flame characteristics, and I'm still learning. I was particularly surprised that flames I thought were way-too-reducing are great for gentle, broad heat, though the piece has to be worked further from the torch's face.
I agree. I do think that the person behind the torch is the most important factor but your skills can be limited by your equipment. A torch like the Lynx is a great asset if you are willing to learn how to exploit it. A lot of folks want WYSIWIG, easy, and short learning curve and the Lynx is certainly not for them.

Dusty, I have also been doing a lot of fuming lately and I love the Lynx for that.

Glassactcc, I am eyeballinging that herbie. As soon as you get bored of it let me know
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Old 2012-06-19, 2:24pm
kansassky kansassky is offline
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Jenne:

I sympathize with you. I experienced huge issues when I switched from a Minor to a Lynx. I was doing so well with boro beads on the Minor. Because the Lynx was three times the price of the Minor, I honestly think I was expecting my results to be three times as good. HA! What a surprise I got! I couldn't make boro strike, I couldn't get the flame adjusted right, oxy pressure higher? propane pressure lower? I couldn't do squat. I was so frustrated. I was disappointed. I even got angry. Then, I had a long talk with myself........deep breath; another deep breath.....

When I regained my equilibrium, I decided part of every learning journey includes a test. Usually, those "tests" poke at one of your most vulnerable spots. (Like for me, my PATIENCE was being tested by the Lynx. You mean, I couldn't just take it out of the box, hook it up, and master the danged thing in an hour? So, I was ticked at the torch. Should have been examining my own unreasonable expectations instead.)

Finally, I got a grip. I set a reasonable goal. When I first started with lampwork, it took me at least 40 hours of PPP to feel like I could consistently make a decent round bead with good boro color. I decided I would give myself EXACTLY 40 hours of PPP on the Lynx. If I didn't feel things were clicking better by then, I would hook up the Minor again. I knew I would be ticked at myself if I caved and didn't try to learn. That's just me. Stubborn as all hell.

I went back to basics. Kept an open mind. Wrote down my questions and called GTT for answers. (BTW, they were a great help on the phone.) Took pointers and hints from folks on the LE forum. I began to see a little bit of light. That was a year ago.

I can only report that today I have made peace with my Lynx. I am still learning--every time I sit at the torch. But, I feel quite a bit better about my own skill. Also, I like the idea that I may go to a studio class someday and find that they are using Lynx torches or some other model. I won't be nearly as intimidated because I have had more exposure and understand the learning curve IS NORMAL!

BTW, I am expecting delivery of an oxy con in a couple weeks. I'm betting that I will be challenged again as I try to adjust to the differences between the oxy concentrator and tanked oxy. AS long as I keep trying to learn more and improve my skills and equipment, I'll continue to experience these learning challenges. It's part of the package. And, I'm not good at standing still....

Feel free to contact me if you think I might be able to help in some way. Hang in there!
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Old 2012-06-19, 2:34pm
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I use a Lynx and there are times I long to hook up my minor again because I was so comfortable using it. The lynx is better for doing murrini pulls so I keep it set up. Can I make it work for beads? Yes. Do I love it for making beads? No.
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Old 2012-06-19, 2:49pm
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Jenne, I hope you dont take my posts in a negative way. Just trying to help. I do believe that if you stick in there and learn the tool you have that you will benefit from working through the learning curve and be better for it.
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Old 2012-08-07, 4:15pm
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Jenna,
I stumbled onto your post for a reason. I had time to torch this week. I had not used the Lynx in a while. When I used it last, I was not thrilled. Guess what? I'm still not thrilled after a couple of years of owning and practicing with it.
I don't know if I'm not the "expert" I should be. It doesn't matter, really. It does fine - you know the kind of "fine" that your last man said you looked as he referred to your outlay of beauty? The reality is here, is that the flame is not bushy enough for me, i.e. there is not enough ambient heat available, and the stress over not wanting the other side of the bead to cool too fast while I'm working on a side, messes with my groove. I don't generally crack beads, but it's a hassle. When it is suggested to work out further in the flame, there's really not enough comfort heat for that. The pinpoint flame is great for detail work, but there is this big disadvantage. If I'm still into the learning curve at this point, I surrender to it. C'est la vie!
Meanwhile, I am looking for a torch that will give me the ambient heat I need in a similar price range. I wish us well! It's not an easy thing to find, it seems.
Maybe I just need to work only in boro and sell off my huge stash of soft. That's a thought....
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Old 2012-08-07, 10:22pm
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Jenna,
I stumbled onto your post for a reason. I had time to torch this week. I had not used the Lynx in a while. When I used it last, I was not thrilled. Guess what? I'm still not thrilled after a couple of years of owning and practicing with it.
I don't know if I'm not the "expert" I should be. It doesn't matter, really. It does fine - you know the kind of "fine" that your last man said you looked as he referred to your outlay of beauty? The reality is here, is that the flame is not bushy enough for me, i.e. there is not enough ambient heat available, and the stress over not wanting the other side of the bead to cool too fast while I'm working on a side, messes with my groove. I don't generally crack beads, but it's a hassle. When it is suggested to work out further in the flame, there's really not enough comfort heat for that. The pinpoint flame is great for detail work, but there is this big disadvantage. If I'm still into the learning curve at this point, I surrender to it. C'est la vie!
Meanwhile, I am looking for a torch that will give me the ambient heat I need in a similar price range. I wish us well! It's not an easy thing to find, it seems.
Maybe I just need to work only in boro and sell off my huge stash of soft. That's a thought....
Let me know if you decide to sell it. A friend wants one.
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Old 2012-08-07, 10:37pm
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Carlisle has produced a new torch that was designed for luccio bubacco I got a chance to play with the Lucio torch at the gathering this is a very nice bushy flame for softglass work, did a fine job with the boro I was playing with too at the show it was selling for $500
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Old 2012-08-08, 8:51am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glassartist View Post
Jenna,
I stumbled onto your post for a reason. I had time to torch this week. I had not used the Lynx in a while. When I used it last, I was not thrilled. Guess what? I'm still not thrilled after a couple of years of owning and practicing with it.
I don't know if I'm not the "expert" I should be. It doesn't matter, really. It does fine - you know the kind of "fine" that your last man said you looked as he referred to your outlay of beauty? The reality is here, is that the flame is not bushy enough for me, i.e. there is not enough ambient heat available, and the stress over not wanting the other side of the bead to cool too fast while I'm working on a side, messes with my groove. I don't generally crack beads, but it's a hassle. When it is suggested to work out further in the flame, there's really not enough comfort heat for that. The pinpoint flame is great for detail work, but there is this big disadvantage. If I'm still into the learning curve at this point, I surrender to it. C'est la vie!
Meanwhile, I am looking for a torch that will give me the ambient heat I need in a similar price range. I wish us well! It's not an easy thing to find, it seems.
Maybe I just need to work only in boro and sell off my huge stash of soft. That's a thought....
Dont think it has anything to do with the glass. Boro needs to be kept up to temp as well. So many folks swear by the lynx for solid work since it can be a pinpoint or a very soft bushy wide flame front depending on the mix of the two oxygen ports. It may be the rest of your setup as in your oxy and propane that is keeping this from working for you or there may actually be something that is physically wrong with your particular torch. Everyone has a different style of working and using the tools that are available to them. I prefer to adapt to and learn the tools since I have always thought the archer should be way more important than the arrow. If large and soft is what you want you may want to look into the Herbert Arnolds as they are known for this characteristic.

Last edited by LarryC; 2012-08-08 at 9:00am.
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Old 2012-08-08, 9:42am
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Jenna, see if you can find a used barracuda I think you wii be VERY happy with it and it runs great on oxy cons. It is a Bethlehem torch and has now been replaced with another (bravo maybe?). I had a lynx and sold it for the Cuba about 8yrs ago, love it.
Chrisann
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  #25  
Old 2012-08-08, 10:20am
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Polgarra Polgarra is offline
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Originally Posted by chrisann View Post
Jenna, see if you can find a used barracuda I think you wii be VERY happy with it and it runs great on oxy cons. It is a Bethlehem torch and has now been replaced with another (bravo maybe?). I had a lynx and sold it for the Cuba about 8yrs ago, love it.
Chrisann
How many oxy-cons do you run it on?
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  #26  
Old 2012-08-08, 11:22am
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I got a Wildcat used from someone here. It's drastically different from the Lynx. It can get as hot, it's just a bushy, less pinpointed flame. And the heat feels completely different. With the Lynx I could get something hot in no time, but it was hard to get the whole piece (larger pieces) nicely balanced without feeling a little stressed about cracks and insurance heat. The Wildcat takes a little longer to heat the whole piece up, but for some reason, it seems to keep it's heat longer. It's difficult to explain.

It's almost like comparing apples to oranges. They may be fruit, but not off the same tree.

One thing about the Wildcat. I find that I need to work much farther out in the flame when using silver glass. Otherwise it auto-strikes/reduces when I don't want it to.
So far though, I'm able to have it do what I was trying to force the Lynx to do...be a soft, bushy flame with more ambient heat.
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  #27  
Old 2012-08-08, 12:41pm
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Maybe consider a Cheetah. I have one and like it much better than my Lynx. Just a thought.
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  #28  
Old 2012-08-08, 1:44pm
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GLASSFREEK GLASSFREEK is offline
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Originally Posted by Jenne View Post
I got a Wildcat used from someone here. It's drastically different from the Lynx. It can get as hot, it's just a bushy, less pinpointed flame. And the heat feels completely different. With the Lynx I could get something hot in no time, but it was hard to get the whole piece (larger pieces) nicely balanced without feeling a little stressed about cracks and insurance heat. The Wildcat takes a little longer to heat the whole piece up, but for some reason, it seems to keep it's heat longer. It's difficult to explain.

It's almost like comparing apples to oranges. They may be fruit, but not off the same tree.

One thing about the Wildcat. I find that I need to work much farther out in the flame when using silver glass. Otherwise it auto-strikes/reduces when I don't want it to.
So far though, I'm able to have it do what I was trying to force the Lynx to do...be a soft, bushy flame with more ambient heat.

The faster the glass is heated, the less core heat it has. Just like cooking a roast, if you put it on broil, the outside gets cooked fast and the inside stays pink. Do the slow roast and the inside and outside end up more even in heat.

If you do end up deciding this is not the torch for you, the Knight Bullet is a great choice for that size range. The center fire is much like the Nortel minor, and the outer flame can be run bushier than the GTT outer fires. Doesn't get hot like the 'cudda can (the body gets burn you hot). If you can't find a used one in your price range, shoot me a PM. Mine has been in storage for a while since I am without studio space, and I may let it go to a good home where it will get some mileage put on it.
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  #29  
Old 2012-08-08, 3:28pm
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Originally Posted by Jenne View Post

I never utilize the middle knob, just because it makes the torch so loud and I torch at night when my 3 year old is sleeping.
This is not only the biggest problem you are having not getting the flame you want, but also can ruin your Gtt. Never run without the middle oxy cracked you can and will melt your torch face. The center oxy not only dials in flame atmosphere, but also acts as a self cooling system for your torch. Want a bushier flame? Extend the propane candles out farther use less oxy from the left bob and just crack your center. These torches have a big learning curve and aren't for everyone. But use the center oxy if you still plan on using it. You don't want to ruin it before you can resell and get the right torch for your needs. Bethlehem also makes awesome user friendly torches.
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  #30  
Old 2012-08-08, 5:19pm
LarryC LarryC is offline
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Originally Posted by Maui Greenstone View Post
This is not only the biggest problem you are having not getting the flame you want, but also can ruin your Gtt. Never run without the middle oxy cracked you can and will melt your torch face. The center oxy not only dials in flame atmosphere, but also acts as a self cooling system for your torch. Want a bushier flame? Extend the propane candles out farther use less oxy from the left bob and just crack your center. These torches have a big learning curve and aren't for everyone. But use the center oxy if you still plan on using it. You don't want to ruin it before you can resell and get the right torch for your needs. Bethlehem also makes awesome user friendly torches.
Ahhh....now I understand. Maybe this torch is not for you.
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