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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2014-05-05, 2:54am
Roshini Roshini is offline
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Default gloves for healing cracks

I have been trying to make sculptural pieces but have encountered several cracks even though I keep annealing as I go along. I thought that if I could take a piece after annealing directly out of the furnace at the high temperature and directly plunge it into the flame I could heal cracks more quickly and efficiently. For that I'd need to use heat resistant gloves.
So my questions are,
Will this method help in sculptural work, especially in healing cracks?
And what glove should I buy that can protect my fingers when working with boro glass at annealing temperature?
Hope someone out there can help!
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  #2  
Old 2014-05-05, 3:13am
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Kevan Kevan is offline
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You have to reintroduce the bead to the flame very slowly. Start by just waving it in and out of the flame far away from the torch. Like 9 or 10 inches away. Roll it around a long time way out in the flame and slowly bring it in. If you just plunge it into the flame it is going to explode. The kiln is hot, but not even close to the heat of the flame.

I've healed lots of beads, even goddess beads, doing this. I took a goddess bead that was a reduction glass, off the mandrel, cleaned it and etched it. Then put it back on a mandrel, slowly introduced it to the flame and reduced it. It kept a texture from the etching, but it was metallic. Very cool.

And I didn't wear gloves.
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Last edited by Kevan; 2014-05-05 at 3:23am.
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  #3  
Old 2014-05-05, 4:06am
Hammer Hammer is offline
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I make my repairs in the kiln with a long neck National Hand Torch. Of course your kiln style dictates if this method is practical.
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  #4  
Old 2014-05-06, 2:27am
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hyperT hyperT is offline
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Why are you getting cracks in the first place? Kevlar gloves may help. I used to use a large piece of agate to put a piece on in the oven, when heated up and all taken out of the oven the agate will retain heat for a long time rising up on your piece so you don't have to reheat slowly. The faster you work the less problems you will have, so know the steps you need to make in your sculpture very well first. The get after it with little or no hesitation.
Also start at one end and work your way through to the other. You can actually chase the stress out of the glass as you go by doing this. In other words don't jump all around the piece while making it.
Figure out the steps you are going to make first, then go to work. By viewing a piece that has cracked under a polariscope you will notice that the stress has been relieved when it cracked.

Last edited by hyperT; 2014-05-06 at 2:33am.
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  #5  
Old 2014-05-06, 5:31am
Roshini Roshini is offline
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Thanks for the feedback! The piece I am attempting to make is much larger than a sculptural beSo,. So I do slowly introduce it into the flame, start from one end and move to the other... However by the time I reach the middle of the piece the end has cooled down and cracks again
Hyper T, do you use a hand held torch while keeping your piece on the agate? also from what I have read Kevlar gloves catch fire if they come in contact with a piece at around 500░c... Am I wrong?
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  #6  
Old 2014-05-06, 5:32am
Roshini Roshini is offline
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I meant 'bead'
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  #7  
Old 2014-05-06, 6:06am
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hyperT hyperT is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roshini View Post
Thanks for the feedback! The piece I am attempting to make is much larger than a sculptural beSo,. So I do slowly introduce it into the flame, start from one end and move to the other... However by the time I reach the middle of the piece the end has cooled down and cracks again
Hyper T, do you use a hand held torch while keeping your piece on the agate? also from what I have read Kevlar gloves catch fire if they come in contact with a piece at around 500░c... Am I wrong?
Don't know about the Kevlar. Didn't know exactly what you are doing. How big is the thing? Yes I use a hand torch and a large agate slab. Let it soak in the oven till its hot. Put it back in the oven with the piece if you need to reheat.
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  #8  
Old 2014-05-08, 3:41am
Hammer Hammer is offline
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Yes Kelvar gloves get REALLY uncomfortable at 500C. Mine didn't really catch on fire they just sort of melt through. Is it possible to use bridges to hold the piece?
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