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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2021-09-22, 5:32am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Smile I need help ,, Please

Hello everyone, It's my first post in the forum.
so I don't know if I am doing it right or wrong

anyway I want to know what is the weirdest tool or unusual tool you have ever used while flamworking?
I do a research as a part of my dissertation about that, so it will be very kind if someone could help me with the simple description for the tool and a photo as will.

And please mention if it is ok for me to use this description and the photo in my research, and then I will need a brief profile about you.

Thanks in advance
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  #2  
Old 2021-09-22, 11:20am
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best thing would be to go visit a local lampworking shop & studio and learn some of the basics. Otherwise what anyone tells you won't make any sense?
Dissertation for what? sounds interesting.
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  #3  
Old 2021-09-23, 6:30am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJohn View Post
best thing would be to go visit a local lampworking shop & studio and learn some of the basics. Otherwise what anyone tells you won't make any sense?
Dissertation for what? sounds interesting.

I wish I could, but unfortunately lampwork studios isn't something familiar here in Egypt.
I had to learn myself for seven years through whatever tutorials available online. so I think I become a master in Distance Learning

It's about "Innovating systems for nationally developing design and production processes of glass flamework".
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  #4  
Old 2021-09-23, 7:14am
rcktscientist rcktscientist is offline
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A very popular tool for sculpting is a simple knife. Some use a butter knife, some a small hunting knife, and others find unique knives or modify knives. I don't do this but maybe someone can provide a pic.
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  #5  
Old 2021-09-23, 8:29am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcktscientist View Post
A very popular tool for sculpting is a simple knife. Some use a butter knife, some a small hunting knife, and others find unique knives or modify knives. I don't do this but maybe someone can provide a pic.

Thanks a lot for your reply. yes, I saw this in some online tutorials, and I thought I had tried it once.

Do you know any thing about T-shaped mandrel ? I saw it when I was searching, but I didn't know what could I use it for?
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  #6  
Old 2021-09-23, 2:45pm
rcktscientist rcktscientist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amal Khaled View Post
Thanks a lot for your reply. yes, I saw this in some online tutorials, and I thought I had tried it once.

Do you know any thing about T-shaped mandrel ? I saw it when I was searching, but I didn't know what could I use it for?
You may be referring to cabochon mandrels. They have a round disk on one end but may look like a T from the side. An actual T mandrel I haven't personally seen.
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  #7  
Old 2021-09-23, 6:25pm
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I have seen a T shaoed mandrel but it was a long time ago. I don't think they're made now. Trying to recall what they were used for.....I think just connector beads. There wasn't a really big demand so it was more of a novelty
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  #8  
Old 2021-09-24, 7:11am
EmeryLawson EmeryLawson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJohn View Post
I have seen a T shaoed mandrel but it was a long time ago. I don't think they're made now. Trying to recall what they were used for.....I think just connector beads. There wasn't a really big demand so it was more of a novelty
Yes, as I remember, they screwed together at the “T”. The entire thing was coated in release and then you could unscrew at the connection to remove the mandrels. Not sure how well it worked, I never had one.
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  #9  
Old 2021-09-24, 9:54am
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I remember that T mandrel too.

Amal, I don’t think I use any unusual tools, but the title of your dissertation makes me think that you might want to consider including info about when best to use tools made of graphite, brass, stainless steel.
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  #10  
Old 2021-09-24, 10:01am
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Also, in the Tips, Techniaues, and Questions forum (not this thread, but the forum that contains this thread), there is a search tool. For me it is at the right side. There is a drop-down arrow where you can select advanced search.” I used it to search foe “tools” in titles only and there are many many threads. This one was at the top of the results. Hope this helps!

http://www.lampworketc.com/forums/sh...ighlight=Tools
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  #11  
Old 2021-09-24, 10:03am
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Apparently there are 97 threads. I don’t know if this will work, but hopefully it will link to the list of 97.

http://www.lampworketc.com/forums/se...rchid=35697084
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  #12  
Old 2021-09-24, 2:10pm
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Amal, the weirdest tool I ever used was an egg slicer. It basically gave the bead grooves that were rippled from the serrated edges of the blades.

The best tool I ever used that wasn't a 'professional' tool, was a stainless steel spoon that I filed grooves into the edges to make a shaper for oval beads.
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  #13  
Old 2021-09-26, 5:24am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Thanks a lot for your response

About the T-shaped mandrel, I found it in this site, but it's only for selling, so there is not much information about how could it been used.

http://www.jplampwork.com/a3tools.htm

so if any one could figure out how it use and for what purpose, it will be great.
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  #14  
Old 2021-09-26, 5:34am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcktscientist View Post
You may be referring to cabochon mandrels. They have a round disk on one end but may look like a T from the side. An actual T mandrel I haven't personally seen.

No, T-shaped mandrel is different than Cabochon mandrels.

But thanks a lot I didn't know about Cabochon mandrel, but when you mentation it, I searched for it, and I think it will be great for me, especially there are a large section talking about the lamp work jewelry in my dissertation.
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  #15  
Old 2021-09-26, 6:03am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainygrrl View Post
I remember that T mandrel too.

Amal, I don’t think I use any unusual tools, but the title of your dissertation makes me think that you might want to consider including info about when best to use tools made of graphite, brass, stainless steel.

It's seems like a good idea. I never thought about that before, I just use the tool this way because they said so.

Are there tools made of brass?!

I was thinking about that idea while I am typing, and figure that I really didn't know why there are some tools made of graphite and other of stainless steel and when best to use each one .
Can you help me with that
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  #16  
Old 2021-09-26, 6:07am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainygrrl View Post
Also, in the Tips, Techniaues, and Questions forum (not this thread, but the forum that contains this thread), there is a search tool. For me it is at the right side. There is a drop-down arrow where you can select advanced search.” I used it to search foe “tools” in titles only and there are many many threads. This one was at the top of the results. Hope this helps!

http://www.lampworketc.com/forums/sh...ighlight=Tools
Thanks for this tip. I went there and began to looking, and its seems like I could find what I am looking for.
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  #17  
Old 2021-09-26, 7:27am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESC View Post
Amal, the weirdest tool I ever used was an egg slicer. It basically gave the bead grooves that were rippled from the serrated edges of the blades.

The best tool I ever used that wasn't a 'professional' tool, was a stainless steel spoon that I filed grooves into the edges to make a shaper for oval beads.

wow, egg slicer. I should try it. just to be sure. I put the bead on the graphite pad, then push the egg slicer in the bead surface, right?

about the second unusual tool, I didn't get the idea, Does it the same idea as the mold? and if you can post a photo it will be perfect.
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  #18  
Old 2021-09-26, 4:08pm
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Amal, this is the spoon marver I made. You can just barely see the grooves I ground on the sides. This was before there were commercial marver for sale.
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  #19  
Old 2021-09-27, 7:03am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESC View Post
Amal, this is the spoon marver I made. You can just barely see the grooves I ground on the sides. This was before there were commercial marver for sale.

yaa, I got the idea now.
Thanks for the photo.
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  #20  
Old 2021-09-27, 7:22am
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I have used can lids to hold frit so you can roll your bead in it (the kind of lids that have raised edges).
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  #21  
Old 2021-09-27, 1:52pm
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T-shaped mandrel: to make three-hole beads – this is called
guru perlen. I think the short stem of T-shaped mandrel can be unscrewed.
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  #22  
Old 2021-09-30, 8:57pm
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Amal, basically brass tools “grab” the hot glass and therefore can move it more quickly than the same graphite tool. I don’t really know how stainless steel compares,but if you find out, please share. The other material that I know is commonly in use is tungsten, which can safely be put into the flame and won’t stick to glass. Different materials, different best uses. Shape also plays a role. You might find some useful info at corinabeads.com - look at the videos about tools - shapers and mega marvers.
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  #23  
Old 2021-10-01, 3:39am
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Just make sure any tungsten you get from a welding shop does not have any thorium in it.

They use tungsten for tig welding with different additives because it changes the way the electric arc behaves bur thoriated tungsten will off gas thorium which is poisonous and I think radioactive and causes cancer.
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  #24  
Old 2021-10-05, 9:14am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eileen View Post
I have used can lids to hold frit so you can roll your bead in it (the kind of lids that have raised edges).
I used a big spoon for that
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  #25  
Old 2021-10-05, 9:21am
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cviki57 View Post
T-shaped mandrel: to make three-hole beads – this is called
guru perlen. I think the short stem of T-shaped mandrel can be unscrewed.
I searched using that expression "guru perlen" and it was a bit helpful for me to figure out more about T-shaped mandrel
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  #26  
Old 2021-10-05, 3:56pm
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainygrrl View Post
Amal, basically brass tools “grab” the hot glass and therefore can move it more quickly than the same graphite tool. I don’t really know how stainless steel compares,but if you find out, please share. The other material that I know is commonly in use is tungsten, which can safely be put into the flame and won’t stick to glass. Different materials, different best uses. Shape also plays a role. You might find some useful info at corinabeads.com - look at the videos about tools - shapers and mega marvers.
you made it more interested for me to do more search about that, and do some kind of separate research about that specific point.
Thanks a lot
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  #27  
Old 2021-10-05, 4:03pm
Amal Khaled Amal Khaled is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedslug View Post
Just make sure any tungsten you get from a welding shop does not have any thorium in it.

They use tungsten for tig welding with different additives because it changes the way the electric arc behaves bur thoriated tungsten will off gas thorium which is poisonous and I think radioactive and causes cancer.
oooh I didn't have any idea about that.
Thanks a lot for the warning.
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  #28  
Old 2021-10-05, 4:15pm
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Yes, I'm thinking it is the green tips that are pure, but I'm not positive.
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  #29  
Old 2021-10-05, 6:09pm
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Tungsten can get red hot and can be used to push a hole in molten glass to put on a chain or chord after it cools.

But be sure to leave enough glass around the hole and take the time after your done shaping it to even the heat distribution in whole piece other wise it will cool too quickly in some places and that may cause it to break apart.

Heat control is really one of the first tricks to learn when you first start out.
Even heating and slow, even, controlled cooling will keep the internal stress from causing it to tear itself apart.
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