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Safety -- Make sure you are safe!

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  #1  
Old 2019-05-03, 10:27pm
Eppa Eppa is offline
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Hello everyone, I'm moving my studio into my basement and was wondering if I can vent out one window and put propane hose out another window about 10 feet away or if that to close? (Diagram in comments)
Also curious about what would be suitable for a replacement air source. Total newb here
Thanks so much for your help

Last edited by Eppa; 2019-05-03 at 11:07pm.
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  #2  
Old 2019-05-03, 10:39pm
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Here's a diagram she shared with me of her work space.....
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  #3  
Old 2019-05-04, 7:02am
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I am no expert, but for what it is worth ~ If I am understanding correctly, you are asking about the exhaust vent, and the propane hose bring fuel to the torch.
I have my propane tank right under the exhaust fan. The incoming replacement air needs to be where the fresh air is, and I think 10 feet should be pretty good.

I personally would have the exhaust fan and propane hose at the end by the torch, and open the window 10 feet away for replacement air.
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Old 2019-05-04, 9:37am
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Are you saying you would vent and put the propane out the same window and use the other window for replacement air?
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Old 2019-05-04, 10:03am
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Yes. Since the air is going out that window, and the propane hose should not have any fumes anyway, I put mine in the same area (I do bring the propane up through the floor of my shed, but the tank is right there.

The replacement air needs to be free of fumes, and the fumes go out the exhaust fan, so they should not be close.

Someone else may have different take on it, but that is what I do. I will take a photo and show you mine in a minute.
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Old 2019-05-04, 10:12am
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You can see where the fan exhaust comes out on the left close to my tank. The window to the right of the door is what I use for makeup air.
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  #7  
Old 2019-05-04, 11:44am
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Hmm thank you! That helps me a lot!
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Old 2019-05-04, 1:05pm
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I'm glad I could help a bit. It is confusing getting started!
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Old 2019-05-04, 1:07pm
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The main thing about fumes is that you don't want to suck the exhaust back in the building. You want fresh air with none of those exhaust fumes coming in to breathe.
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Old 2019-05-04, 4:15pm
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What Eileen says is correct. I have my exhaust going out one side of my garage and the clean air is coming in form the door opposite. My tank is on the same side of the garage as my exhaust fan. It is also outside.

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Old 2019-05-04, 5:26pm
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Its not the hose that worries me,, it's how close your tank may be to the window.. If your tank leaks and its close to any window then the fumes can go inside... Some places have laws where a tank has to be so far from a window.. just a thought

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Old 2019-05-04, 6:19pm
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Same for me - I put my hose out the bottom of the window where my vent hood exhausts out the top. I stretch the hose over about 10 feet to the propane tank sitting on my deck. Quick Connects on the tank make it real easy. Do check for leaks often. Propane sinks and pools and your basement will be the lowest point it can go. Dispersing it would be difficult.
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Old 2019-05-04, 9:42pm
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Thank you everyone!
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Old 2019-05-05, 4:31am
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You should put a paver brick or something similar under the tank to prevent moisture from the ground causing the tank to rust.

Actually, even concrete pavers will allow some moisture through so some kind of plastic blocks would be the best long term solution.

Three or four half inch long pieces of PVC pipe on edge would be great as "feet" under the tank and would be quick, cheap and easy.

I have to second the idea of locating the tank ten feet or more from any open basement window. Propane sinks and will 'pool' down in the basement until it gets to the pilot light on the water heater or the furnace and insurance won't cover the resulting damage.

You can get any kind of plastic yard box to put the tank in to keep the little hands and critters away from it.
Just make sure the box has openings in the bottom.

Also you can keep the sun off the hose by just running the hose inside some PVC pipes.


What has been said about the 10 foot distance from exhaust venting and make-up air inlet is the minimum.

You could just run your exhaust duct work outside an extra 10 or 15 feet and that would allow you to use the same window to get the exhaust outside and bring in fresh air.

You will want to put a screen or cap of some kind on it to keep the critters out.

Stay safe and think it all through.
Every situation is unique but the good news is you only have to figure it out once for that situation.
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Old 2019-05-05, 6:51am
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It never dawned on me that the propane could go in the window, never having had the basement experience! Good that some of you were aware of that!

And I agree on the propane tanks. Mine is not visible in that photo, but I have a couple of concrete building blocks that it is sitting on, so it is (6" ?) off the ground, and any fumes can just flow off the blocks. I have a plastic garbage can that sits upside down over top of the tank when not in use.
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Old 2019-05-07, 12:23pm
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Thank you all! Thus will require about a 20ft hose I think. My current hose is attached to the oxygen hose and came with my torch. A Nortel minor. Since I live in bfe I'll have to order one online. Any particular type of hose you suggest?
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Old 2019-05-07, 6:59pm
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My first thought is to buy welders red and green hose and just split it down the middle.
Just make sure it is labeled "Type T".
Propane gas will corrode the inside of regular welders hose and cause it to get gummy on the inside which will then glue up the inside of your torch and then you will have to send it in to the manufacturer to get it cleaned.
Also remember to change welders hose every 10 years because it deteriorates just from getting old and can crack and then leak.

My second thought is to get Bar-B-Que hose.
You may have to visit a Bar-B-Que dealer but the big box hardware stores might have the length you need.
They are already designed to handle propane and you can get them with a 5 psi regulator which works good with the smaller torches.

Then you only a short welders hose for oxygen for an oxygen concentrator and you can just leave the "red hose" attached and un-used.
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Last edited by Speedslug; 2019-05-07 at 7:03pm.
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  #18  
Old 2019-05-07, 8:32pm
Eppa Eppa is offline
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Thanks so much
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Old 2019-05-08, 7:41pm
Lisa Cook Lisa Cook is offline
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Real Newbie here. Is it not OK to have your propane tank and oxygen concentrator in the room with you?
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  #20  
Old 2019-05-08, 9:20pm
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Propane is illegal to have inside if larger than the small 1 lb canisters and can void your insurance. A big risk if anything goes wrong. Oxygen is okay I believe. A fire extinguisher should be on hand anyway, but I would not take a chance with propane in the home.
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Old 2019-05-09, 9:07am
Lisa Cook Lisa Cook is offline
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Thanks Eileen - I'm going to hose it in through a window.
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  #22  
Old 2019-05-09, 2:12pm
Bgravy Bgravy is offline
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As long as you have forced air coming in with the tank outside I think that would be ok. Propane is heavier than air and in a basement will sink to the floor and stay there. Mix a furnace into the mix and you have an explosion risk. As long as the fan comes on before the propane and stays on as long as the propane is coming through that hose you're kind of safe. Im saying kind of safe because if power goes out and the flame goes out and you are outside rescuing a child from a seedy person then the furnace lights the gas as you walk in bye bye house and life, for sure all your hair because propane burns really really hot. Personally I would use another location or another lighter than air gas. This being said as long as you're very careful and make sure you have lots of air coming in before and after using propane and always making sure escaping gas is always being burned then you're ok. Sorry it's the safety officer coming out of me, the risk of explosion is low depending on how much gas your releasing mer minute and how long it takes to light.

NEVER Leave the gas on you will go into space at some point if your furnace burns natural gas. Electric switches can also light the propane if it's been left on including the one in your fan. Even the motor could depending on the type of motor used.

Always vent the space immediately as the gas comes on and for a few minutes after using.

Never leave the hose connected running inside the house when not in use. This will add a level of security you can see from outside that you're not going to become an astronaut in the middle of the night.


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  #23  
Old 2019-05-09, 7:55pm
Lisa Cook Lisa Cook is offline
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Thanks for that. I'm actually not in a basement - we don't have those in California. But the safety info is appreciated as I've just moved into a new home and am setting up my glass studio.
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  #24  
Old 2019-05-10, 4:07pm
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Propane tanks over one pound should not be inside houses.

It was only some twenty years ago that they figured out that brass valves on propane tanks bigger than 1lb were leaking out of the safety valves designed to vent if the tank went over pressure even if they were not over pressure.
So a 'safety device' was causing a 'safety problem' back then.

Also, the valves on the tanks are made out of a soft type of brass so that the internal faces seat properly.
This can be a problem if they get 'over tightened' by someone that doesn't know about it and you can get a very slow leak.

So don't keep any thing more than -one- 1lb can in your house at a time.
Plumbers hand torch size, and that one will count as the only one you get to have.

And your insurance company WILL deny any claim for any reason and simply having more than one 1lb can is legally justification even if the damage you are filling for has nothing to do with it.

This includes flames, gas of any kind or someone running a car through your living room wall.

Heck, even hail damage to your roof can be denied if they can find more than one 1lb can of fuel.


Insurers as a business designed to take your money.
They will settle with banks as mortgage companies because the banks have lawyers as big as the insurers.

You have to hire a lawyer to get your money out of your insurer.
Kind of like car dealers.
They are not your friend.
They are just in business to get your money for their shareholders.
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Last edited by Speedslug; 2019-05-10 at 4:15pm.
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